Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Selected Quotes and excerpts from Sand & Foam(Part2) by Khalil Gibran

Music:
A Single Man (Soundtrack)-George's Waltz
Abel Korzeniowski, Shigeru Umebayashi



Excerpts from SAND & FOAM(Part2)
Khalil Gibran

It was but yesterday I thought myself a fragment quivering
without rhythm in the sphere of life.Now I know that I am
the sphere, and all life in rhythmic fragments moves within me.

We were fluttering, wandering, longing creatures a thousand
thousand years before the sea and the wind in the forest
gave us words.Now how can we express the ancient of days
in us with only the sounds of our yesterdays?

Poetry is wisdom that enchants the heart.
Wisdom is poetry that sings in the mind.
If we could enchant man's heart and at the same time sing in his mind,
Then in truth he would live in the shadow of God.

Wisdom ceases to be wisdom when it becomes too proud to weep,
too grave to laugh, and too self-ful to seek other than itself.


Should you really open your eyes and see,
you would behold your image in all images.
And should you open your ears and listen,
you would hear your own voice in all voices.

Now let us play hide and seek. Should you hide in my heart
it would not be difficult to find you. But should you hide
behind your own shell, then it would be useless for anyone
to seek you. A woman may veil her face with a smile.

Your saying to me, "I do not understand you," is praise beyond my worth,
and an insult you do not deserve. How mean am I when life gives me gold
and I give you silver, and yet I deem myself generous.

On my way to the Holy City I met another pilgrim and I asked him,
"Is this indeed the way to the Holy City?"
And he said, "Follow me, and you will reach the Holy City
in a day and a night."And I followed him. And we walked many
days and many nights,yet we did not reach the Holy City.
And what was to my surprise he became angry with me because
he had misled me.


I have no enemies, O God, but if I am to have an enemy.
Let his strength be equal to mine, That truth alone may be the victor.

Should we all confess our sins to one another we would all laugh
at one another for our lack of originality. Should we all reveal our virtues we would also laugh for the same cause.

We are all climbing toward the summit of our hearts' desire.
Should the other climber steal your sack and your purse and
wax fat on the one and heavy on the other, you should pity him;
The climbing will be harder for his flesh, and the burden will
make his way longer.
help him a step; it will add to your swiftness.

Desire is half of life; idifference is half of death.

Birth and death are the two noblest expressions of bravery.

Death is not nearer to the aged than to the new-born; neither is life.

Life is a procession. The slow of foot finds it too swift and he steps out;
And the swift of foot finds it too slow and he too steps out.

I said to Life, "I would hear Death speak."
And Life raised her voice a little higher and said, "You hear him now."

When you have solved all the mysteries of life you
long for death, for it is but another mystery of life.

They say to me, "A bird in the hand is worth ten in the bush."
But I say, "A bird and a feather in the bush is worth more
than ten birds in the hand."
Your seeking after that feather is life with winged feet; nay, it is life itself.


There are only two elements here, beauty and truth;
beauty in the hearts of lovers, and truth in the arms of the tillers of the soil.

He who listens to truth is not less than he who utters truth.

Many a doctrine is like a window pane.
We see truth through it but it divides us from truth.

If you sing of beauty though alone in the heart
of the desert you will have an audience.

Great beauty captures me, but a beauty
still greater frees me even from itself.

Beauty shines brighter in the heart of him who
longs for it than in the eyes of him who sees it.


Every thought I have imprisoned in expression I must free by my deeds.

I am the flame and I am the dry bush,
and one part of me consumes the other part.

Strange that you should pity the slow-footed and not the slow-minded,
And the blind-eyed rather than the blind-hearted.

Every great man I have known had something small in his make-up;
and it was that small something which prevented inactivity or madness or suicide.

When my cup is empty I resign myself to its emptiness;
but when it is half full I resent its half-fulness.

Half of what I say is meaningless; but I say it
so that the other half may reach you.

My loneliness was born when men praised my talkative
faults and blamed my silent virtues.

Solitude is a silent storm that breaks down all our dead branches;
Yet it sends our living roots deeper into the living heart of the living earth.


How blind is he who gives you out of his pocket that
he may take out of your heart.

They deem me mad because I will not sell my days for gold;
And I deem them mad because they think my days have a price.

They spread before us their riches of gold and silver, of ivory and ebony,
and we spread before them our hearts and our spirits.;
And yet they deem themselves the hosts and us the guests.


How noble is the sad heart who would sing a joyous song with joyous hearts.

When either your joy or your sorrow becomes great the world becomes small.

The bitterest thing in our today's sorrow is the memory of our yesterday's joy.

Your other self is always sorry for you.
But your other self grows on sorrow; so all is well.

Only great sorrow or great joy can reveal your truth.
If you would be revealed you must either dance naked
in the sun, or carry your cross.

Should nature heed what we say of contentment no river would seek the sea,
and no winter would turn to Spring. Should she heed all we say of thrift,
how many of us would be breathing this air?


We often borrow from our tomorrows to pay our debts to our yesterdays.

Should you sit upon a cloud you would not see the boundary line between
one country and another, nor the boundary stone between a farm and a farm.
It is a pity you cannot sit upon a cloud.

Only those with secrets in their hearts
could divine the secrets in our hearts.

Strange that we all defend our wrongs with
more vigor than we do our rights.

How heedless you are when you would have men fly with
your wings and you cannot even give them a feather.

I would walk with all those who walk.
I would not stand still to watch the procession passing by.


How can you sing if your mouth be filled with food?
How shall your hand be raised in blessing if it is filled with gold?

You may judge others only according to your knowledge of yourself.
Tell me now, who among us is guilty and who is unguilty?

You cannot judge any man beyond your knowledge of him,
and how small is your knowledge.

IF IT WERE not for our conception of weights and measures we would
stand in awe of the firefly as we do before the sun.

Monday, August 22, 2016

Your heart is too divine by Alfred De Musset


The heart that once has been your shrine
for other loves is too divine.
Alfred de Musset

I don't know where my road is going, but I know
that I walk better when I hold your hand.
Alfred de Musset

But I have loved by Alfred de Musset


... but one loves, and when one is on the brink of death,
one turns around to look backward, and one says to oneself:
"I have often suffered, I have sometimes been wrong, but I have loved.
Alfred de Musset

Saturday, August 20, 2016

If we could be like this tiny bird by Gertrude Tooley Buckingham


A bird is three things: Feathers, flight and song,
And feathers are the least of these.
Marjorie Allen Seiffert

I heard the sweet voice of a robin,
High up in the maple tree,
Joyously, singing his happy song
To his feathered mate, in glee!...
If we could be like this tiny bird,
Just living from day to day,
Holding no bitterness in our hearts
For those we meet on our way...
Gertrude Tooley Buckingham, "Heaven on Earth"

Friday, August 19, 2016

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